Valves 
Right, the valves are out and everything cleaned. It's looking like it's going to be an expensive trip to a reconditioning workshop for my head :(

The exhaust valves are very badly recessed and a couple of the valve stems are very sloppy in their guides. The exhausts are far worse than the inlets which surprisingly seem to have very little wear. Again it's cylinder 1 and cylinder 4 that are the worst as expected, the exhaust valve seats are heavily pitted and have deep steps before even attempting any grinding. It would be daft to grind the valves in and put the engine back together in that state as the manual specifically says that it needs inserts and new seats cutting.

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Opening the engine 
Well still no photos I'm afraid, I really must remember to take some next time the sun comes out!

I've finally opened the engine and seen the extent of the carbon deposits. Cylinder 1 is worst, number 4 is bad, with 2 and 3 fairly clean (in comparison!). There is a good 5mm thick layer of hard coke covering everything in cylinder 1, I've not removed any of the valves from the head yet to see what state they're in but the cylinder liners are visually fine, there is no deep scoring and all the piston rings on number 1 are intact. I guess it is just even wear all over and probably a poor seal around the valves.

There's a lot of cleaning to do to remove all the black sludge from the sump etc so there's plenty of jobs to keep me busy until I pluck up the courage to pull the pistons out.

In other news I got my seat pan back from my dad's friend with the big hole patched up. I've ground back the welds, filled all the biggest gaps with epoxy and given it a first coat of primer. Just need to decide how I'm going to fit it back onto the seat hinge now. It was riveted rather than welded but I may find some small nuts and bolts I haven't decided yet.

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Steering again 
I finally got around to acquiring a replacement steering casting to replace the cracked and crumbling original. I bought it off J. P. Bell of Scunthorpe. His shed is an Aladdin's cave with tractor parts from floor to ceiling so I'm sure I'll be visiting him again!

I removed the steering shaft from the "new" casting and just like on mine the top bearing immediately disintegrated scattering rusty rollers everywhere. I suppose this is because the bearing relies entirely upon being kept well greased, there is no way for oil to work up to it. Luckily my original lower bearing was in good condition so the pair of lower sets of rollers gave me a complete set of parts. I used the "new" steering shaft as my old one was bent and the threaded part pretty smashed in from removing the totally rusted on steering wheel.

The casting is in fine condition however the dashboard fixing bolts were sheared off at the rear which took some effort to knock out. Also the rusted remains of the four pins which secure the serial number plate were wedged in their holes. Three knocked out with minimal effort but one was stuck fast. I ended up removing a fair amount of metal from the inside of the casting around the hole before it finally came free. I filled this crater with steel epoxy and re-drilled the hole before finally giving the whole thing a coating of primer.

The steering column is now fully rebuilt and back on the tractor so I can finally move the tractor without the fun and games of front wheels that point in different directions!

No photos for now unfortunately because the old "broken" camera that I use to take pics out tractoring has finally given up the ghost completely. I'll have to remember to take some photos with my good camera next time I'm out there before I get my hands dirty.

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Back together 


The back end is all back together and filled with fresh oil!

I've jacked one of the wheels up so the diff could turn and run the tractor for a bit to work all the oil around the gears and diff.

The lift arms shoot up instantly now and don't drop with me sat on the fork even hours after the engine is switched off, so I think that proves there's no wear on the hydraulic internals! Must have just been leaks through the valves caused by grit. Obviously not had a chance to put any real weight on the lift yet and set up the stops but I can relax a bit now that the back end is filled with oil again.

Before I run the tractor again I really must get the missing air filter parts sorted out because the governor is very twitchy with such a low vacuum. I had a sheet of plastic with a small hole in over the end of the intake while I was testing the hydraulics. Not ideal at all...

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Squidgy Muck 
Today I cracked open the back end and removed the pump and lifting parts. The inside of the back end was in a terrible state with thick muck in every crevice, it's no wonder the hydraulics weren't very effective. After flushing out the muck with petrol and a very thorough hose down it's looking much much closer to being "scrupulously clean" as demanded by the manual!





Now I just need a sunny day to dry it all out again so I don't end up with water in the oil again! (when I opened the drain tap below the gearbox I got a fair bit of water before any oil appeared...)

The pump has scrubbed up very nicely. I opened one of the valves up to check the condition inside and there's no muck in there at all. I don't think I'll bother stripping the pump down any further because there doesn't seem to be any wear or damage. With some good clean oil it should work as well as the day it left the factory



The lift gear is unfortunately not so pretty... I can't get in to clean the sludge out properly, and there's been a lot of corrosion and damage to the top link parts. I can't get the yoke part to unscrew so it's soaking in WD40 overnight and I'll try lots of heat and leverage tomorrow.



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